New Legal History Journal Subscription

Jus Gentium Front CoverThe Osgoode Library now subscribes to JUS GENTIUM: Journal of International Legal History, the first issue of which has just recently been published. Jus Gentium is the first American journal dedicated to addressing the history of international law. Much of modern scholarship on the history of international law is preoccupied not with international law, but with international legal doctrine; the doctrinal writings of remarkably few individuals dominate the discourse while the rest remain unseen or overlooked. This journal will encourage further exploration in the archives, for new materials and confirmation of the accuracy of past uses, but welcoming the continued reassessment of international legal history in all of its dimensions.

Our subscription is online only and is available on the HeinOnline Law Journals Library.

American Law Institute (ALI) Library on HeinOnline

The Osgoode Hall Law School Library now subscribes to the ALI (American Law Institute) Library on HeinOnline, making all ALI publications available to our users in a comprehensive, searchable, online format!

The American Law Institute is the leading independent organization in the United States producing scholarly work to clarify, modernize, and otherwise improve the law – a sort of Law Reform Commission for America. The ALI is made up of lawyers, judges, and law professors of the highest qualifications. It drafts, discusses, revises, and publishes the Restatements of the Law, model statutes, and principles of law that are enormously influential in the courts and legislatures, as well as in legal scholarship and education.

HeinOnline’s ALI Library includes everything from drafts to historical content. New content, including drafts, is added the library without delay as soon as it is approved by the ALI. Browse options have also been recently reorganized to align with the American Law Institute’s categorizations, including a new Current Projects subcollection.

HeinOnline ALI Content Includes:

  •  Restatements of the Law – Including Current Restatements
  • Principles of the Law – Including Current Principles
  • Linking to Current Case Law
  • Uniform Commercial Code
  • ALI Annual Reports
  • Proceedings of ALI Annual Meetings
  • ALI Annual Speech Meetings
  • The ALI Reporter
  • “Statement of Essential Human Rights” Archive
  • Model Penal Code
  • And much more!

Members of the Osgoode Hall Law School and York University communities can access the ALI Library from our standard HeinOnline link. For more information or for help using the collection, please consult any of the reference librarians.

Exhibit in the Osgoode Library – Lawyers without Rights: Jewish Lawyers in Germany under the Third Reich

Nazis block Jews from entering the University of Vienna. Austria, 1938. Photograph from the National Archives & Records Administration, College Park, MD

Nazis block Jews from entering the University of Vienna. Austria, 1938. Photograph from the National Archives & Records Administration, College Park, MD

The Osgoode Hall Law School Library is proud to be hosting the highly acclaimed international exhibition “Lawyers without Rights: Jewish Lawyers in Germany under the Third Reich”. The exhibition was prepared by the German Federal Bar (Bundesrechtsanwaltskammer) and was translated into English and prepared for exhibit in North America by the American Bar Association. It has been shown in nearly 100 cities in Germany, the United States and other countries: the Osgoode Library is the only Canadian venue for the exhibit. The exhibition at Osgoode is sponsored by the Jack & Mae Nathanson Centre on Transnational Human Rights, Crime & Security at Osgoode Hall Law School.

“As important as it is to our everyday lives as a bulwark against arbitrary governance, the rule of law can never be taken for granted,” said Associate Professor and Nathanson Director François Tanguay-Renaud. “This exhibition – focusing on an insufficiently known aspect of the Third Reich – constitutes a vibrant historical testament to the importance of lawyers in holding governments to account, and the grave threats to social organization that inevitably follow when their role is undermined.

“Given Osgoode’s core mission to educate tomorrow’s lawyers and, through bodies like the Nathanson Centre, generate cutting-edge research about their responsibilities and predicaments at home and abroad, ‘Lawyers without Rights’ serves as a forceful, eye-opening reminder of what we stand for, and stand against,” said Tanguay-Renaud.

The idea for the exhibition was conceived in 1998 when an Israeli lawyer asked the regional bar of Berlin for a list of Jewish lawyers whose licences had been revoked by the Nazi regime.

“The regional bar decided not only to research a list of names but also to try to find out more about the fates behind all those names,” said Axel Filges, past president of the German Federal Bar. “Some were able to leave the country after the Nazis came into power, but very many of them were incarcerated or murdered. The non-Jewish German lawyers of those days remained silent. They failed miserably, and so did the lawyers’ organizations. We do not know why.”

After the Berlin bar transformed its research into an exhibition, other regional bars began asking whether they could show it and add their own research. “So, like a puzzle, a portrait of the fate of Jewish lawyers in Germany has emerged step by step,” Filges said.

Related to the exibit, Osgood Hall Law School and The Nathanson Centre will host “Nuremberg at 70: A Commemorative Panel on the Implications of the Trials for Legal and Medical Ethics” on Saturday, November 20, 2015. Speakers include Mélanie Deshaies (Osgoode), Eric Gertner (Ryerson/McCarthy Tétrault), Hengameh Saberi(Osgoode), and Dean Lorne Sossin (Osgoode). The panel will be take place at Osgoode Hall Law School (Ignat Kaneff Building), in Room IKB 2027, 12:30-2:30 pm.

The exhibit is on view in the Library from Monday, November 9, through Sunday, November 22. The hours are Monday to Thursday, from 8:00 am to 10:00 pm; Friday, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm; and Saturday and Sunday, from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm.

Canada Added to the Library of Congress Indigenous Law Portal

Law Library of CongressThis is a wonderful gift from our neighbours to the south. On June 21, in celebration of our National Aboriginal Day, the Law Library of Congress opened the Canadian portion of their Indigenous Law Portal, expanding the portal’s coverage for the first time beyond the United States. The Canadian portion of the Indigenous Law Portal is divided into three regions: Eastern, Western, and Northern Canada.  These regions closely follow the recently updated K Class – Law Classification.  There is an alphabetical master list of Individual First Nation, Inuit and Métis peoples. The list can also be browsed can be accessed from one  of , or browsed either by region or by province.

National Aboriginal Day began in 1996. A Proclamation declaring June 21 of each year as National Aboriginal Day made the summer solstice, June 21, a day to recognize the heritage, culture, and achievements of Canada’s indigenous peoples. National Aboriginal Day is the first of the a series of national celebrations, followed by Saint Jean-Baptiste Day (La Fête nationale du Québec) on June 24 and Canada Day on July 1.

Read more on the Law Library of Congress’s blog post.

 

The Jarvis-Irving Collection

Samuel Jarvis, 1792-1857

Samuel Jarvis, 1792-1857

In several separate purchases over the past year, the Osgoode Library has managed to acquire a collection of law books, the Jarvis-Irving Collection, comprising 32 titles (67 volumes) that belonged to Samuel Peters Jarvis (1792-1857), a lawyer and prominent Toronto citizen and member of the Family Compact in Upper Canada.

Jarvis was born in Newark (now Niagara-on-the-Lake) in 1792, when it was the capital of the colony of Upper Canada. His father, William Jarvis, enjoyed the patronage of Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe, who granted him the offices of provincial secretary and registrar. Samuel Jarvis was educated at Reverend  John Strachan‘s Grammar School in Cornwall, after which he took up legal studies in the office of Attorney General William Firth. His articles were interrupted by the War of 1812, in which he saw considerable action, including service with Major-General Sir Isaac Brock at the capture of Detroit and at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He was called to Bar in 1815.

Though from an established family and well-positioned for success, Jarvis’s fiery temperament and impetuous nature initially thwarted his chances at preferment. In 1817, he killed John Ridout, son of Surveyor General Thomas Ridout, in a duel, though he was later exonerated. In 1826, with a group of other Tory young bloods, he invaded and ransacked the offices of William Lyon Mackenzie, an offence for which he was heavily fined. Despite these blots on his character, Jarvis was appointed deputy provincial secretary and registrar by Lieutenant Governor Sir Peregrine Maitland in 1827, and subsequently Chief Superintendent of Indian Affairs by Lieutenant Governor Sir Francis Bond Head in 1837. Jarvis did not prove a great success in either of these roles. After several investigations into mismanagement, the office of Chief Superintendent was abolished in in 1845 and Jarvis, in disgrace, retired to private life. Faced with financial problems, he subdivided and sold off most of the 100-acre park east of Yonge Street in Toronto that he had inherited from his father. In 1847, Hazelburn, the house he had built there 23 years earlier, was torn town to make way for for the street which still bears Jarvis’s name. Jarvis died in 1857.

This collection is called the Jarvis-Irving Collection, as it was subsequently passed on to Jarvis’s daughter-in-law’s brother, Sir Aemilius Irving (1823-1913), the longest-serving Treasurer of the Law Society of Upper Canada. We are extremely proud of this collection, as it is rare to be able to rebuild such a substantial collection of law books from so early a period in our national and legal history.

New HeinOnline Library: Religion and the Law

heinonline_logo The Osgoode Library now subscribes to the new library in HeinOnline: Religion and the Law. Consisting of more than 1,200 titles and 600,000 pages that include books, periodicals, and bibliographies, this collection provides a research platform for the development, history, organization, and fundamental principles of various world religions. The collection also includes the Christian Legal Society publications, an assortment of Canon Law, and rare historical bibles. This collection will grow considerably as additional new material is added in the future.

Currently, this new collection features works on:

  • Canon Law
  • History of the Church & State
  • Religion & Freedom
  • Jewish Law
  • Reformation Period
  • Early Constitutions of the Church
  • Religion & Politics
  • The Bible in Public Schools
  • And More!

Like other specialist topical libraries on HeinOnline, the Library includes scholarly articles assembled from HeinOnline’s extensive holdings of law journals, as well as digitzed scholarly texts and a custom bibliography. For more information about the library, click here.

New Law Journal from Thomson Rivers: Canadian Journal of Comparative and Contemporary Law

CJCCL-logoThe new Canadian Journal of Comparative and Contemporary Law (CJCCL) was launched in 2013 at Thompson Rivers University, Faculty of Law (TRU Law). The inaugural issue was published just last month (January 2015). This issue has for its theme “Health Law and Human Rights”, focusing on the interrelationship between health law and human rights and featuring contributions from nationally and internationally acclaimed scholars in the field including a Foreword by Osgoode’s own Dean Lorne Sossin. The thematic focus of the CJCCL’s second issue, to be published in January 2016 will be “Equity in the 21st Century: Problems and Perspectives”.  For further details, visit the journal’s submissions page.

The CJCCL is an open access journal. Articles may be downloaded from the journal’s website free of charge. CJCCL articles will be also accessible through HeinOnline, Westlaw and Google Scholar. At least one volume will be published annually.

The CJCCL aims to establish itself as a top-rated academic publication. Its mandate is to publish rigorous, innovative scholarship that makes a significant contribution to legal study. The CJCCL’s Editors in Chief select a specific theme that will be the focus of each year’s issue, facilitating a penetrating analysis of a particular legal topic to a greater degree than other, general interest academic law reviews. Contributors are also encouraged to take a comparative approach in their scholarship.

TRU Law and the editors of the CJCCL are to be congratulated on this landmark event in the life of their new law school and for their significant contribution to Canadian legal scholarship.