LégisQuébec Collection of Quebec Statutes and Regulations Now Available Free

publications-quebecLégisQuébec, the website that contains the official versions of Quebec laws and regulations and which used to require a subscription to access, is now available free on the web. Of course, the site is available in both French and English versions. Documents are available in HTML, PDF or EPUB formats.

LégisQuébec is produced and made available by the Éditeur officiel du Québec, Quebec’s government printer, and is a part of their commitment to making official legal information widely accessible to the public. The site offers a very useful and informative FAQ. Here’s a summary of the contents:

Other publications of the Quebec National Assembly can be found here.

Legal Resources on the Brexit

BrexitThe United Kingdom European Union Membership Referendum, also known as the EU referendum or Brexit referendum (because of the potential exit of Britain from the EU), is a plebiscite scheduled to take place in the United Kingdom and Gibraltar on June 23, 2016. Membership in the European Union has been a topic of debate in the United Kingdom since before the country joined the European Economic Community (EEC or “Common Market”), as it was known then, in 1973.

To help inform a broader cross-section of the public and provide them with authoritative analysis on questions that relate to the highly contentious possibility of a Brexit, Oxford University Press has now made freely available a large selection of materials from the Oxford Public International Law database relating to the Brexit debate. To keep track of recent commentary on and information about the legal consequences of a Brexit, they have also made available a new Brexit Debate Map.

Readers can also keep themselves informed by consulting theBBC’s All You Need to Know page on the Brexit referendum debate.

 

 

 

Quebec and Federal Content Enhancements to CanLII

CanLII has recently announced some significant content enhancements to their offerings of federal Quebec materials – and an exciting development for freely available legal information.

In collaboration with the Quebec Centre d’accès à l’information juridique (CAIJ), the following substantial caselaw offerings have been added to the Quebec databases:

Further, we should all be particularly excited that CanLII has now added Quebec and Federal annual statutes:

Again, thanks to their supplier Lexum‘s programmatic wizardry, CanLII not only hosts the annual statutes as static documents but integrates them dynamically to the rest of their legislation collections.

Let’s hope this is just the beginning, and that we will soon be able to see even more annual statutes for all provinces and territories on CanLII in the future.

We have also been able to add the following caselaw to our Quebec databases:

This is an exciting development for freely available legal information, and we are pleased to have the opportunity to work with CAIJ to leverage lawyers’ investments in both our organizations.

You can read the press releases from CanLII, CAIJ and Lexum.

New Legal History Journal Subscription

Jus Gentium Front CoverThe Osgoode Library now subscribes to JUS GENTIUM: Journal of International Legal History, the first issue of which has just recently been published. Jus Gentium is the first American journal dedicated to addressing the history of international law. Much of modern scholarship on the history of international law is preoccupied not with international law, but with international legal doctrine; the doctrinal writings of remarkably few individuals dominate the discourse while the rest remain unseen or overlooked. This journal will encourage further exploration in the archives, for new materials and confirmation of the accuracy of past uses, but welcoming the continued reassessment of international legal history in all of its dimensions.

Our subscription is online only and is available on the HeinOnline Law Journals Library.

American Law Institute (ALI) Library on HeinOnline

The Osgoode Hall Law School Library now subscribes to the ALI (American Law Institute) Library on HeinOnline, making all ALI publications available to our users in a comprehensive, searchable, online format!

The American Law Institute is the leading independent organization in the United States producing scholarly work to clarify, modernize, and otherwise improve the law – a sort of Law Reform Commission for America. The ALI is made up of lawyers, judges, and law professors of the highest qualifications. It drafts, discusses, revises, and publishes the Restatements of the Law, model statutes, and principles of law that are enormously influential in the courts and legislatures, as well as in legal scholarship and education.

HeinOnline’s ALI Library includes everything from drafts to historical content. New content, including drafts, is added the library without delay as soon as it is approved by the ALI. Browse options have also been recently reorganized to align with the American Law Institute’s categorizations, including a new Current Projects subcollection.

HeinOnline ALI Content Includes:

  •  Restatements of the Law – Including Current Restatements
  • Principles of the Law – Including Current Principles
  • Linking to Current Case Law
  • Uniform Commercial Code
  • ALI Annual Reports
  • Proceedings of ALI Annual Meetings
  • ALI Annual Speech Meetings
  • The ALI Reporter
  • “Statement of Essential Human Rights” Archive
  • Model Penal Code
  • And much more!

Members of the Osgoode Hall Law School and York University communities can access the ALI Library from our standard HeinOnline link. For more information or for help using the collection, please consult any of the reference librarians.

Exhibit in the Osgoode Library – Lawyers without Rights: Jewish Lawyers in Germany under the Third Reich

Nazis block Jews from entering the University of Vienna. Austria, 1938. Photograph from the National Archives & Records Administration, College Park, MD

Nazis block Jews from entering the University of Vienna. Austria, 1938. Photograph from the National Archives & Records Administration, College Park, MD

The Osgoode Hall Law School Library is proud to be hosting the highly acclaimed international exhibition “Lawyers without Rights: Jewish Lawyers in Germany under the Third Reich”. The exhibition was prepared by the German Federal Bar (Bundesrechtsanwaltskammer) and was translated into English and prepared for exhibit in North America by the American Bar Association. It has been shown in nearly 100 cities in Germany, the United States and other countries: the Osgoode Library is the only Canadian venue for the exhibit. The exhibition at Osgoode is sponsored by the Jack & Mae Nathanson Centre on Transnational Human Rights, Crime & Security at Osgoode Hall Law School.

“As important as it is to our everyday lives as a bulwark against arbitrary governance, the rule of law can never be taken for granted,” said Associate Professor and Nathanson Director François Tanguay-Renaud. “This exhibition – focusing on an insufficiently known aspect of the Third Reich – constitutes a vibrant historical testament to the importance of lawyers in holding governments to account, and the grave threats to social organization that inevitably follow when their role is undermined.

“Given Osgoode’s core mission to educate tomorrow’s lawyers and, through bodies like the Nathanson Centre, generate cutting-edge research about their responsibilities and predicaments at home and abroad, ‘Lawyers without Rights’ serves as a forceful, eye-opening reminder of what we stand for, and stand against,” said Tanguay-Renaud.

The idea for the exhibition was conceived in 1998 when an Israeli lawyer asked the regional bar of Berlin for a list of Jewish lawyers whose licences had been revoked by the Nazi regime.

“The regional bar decided not only to research a list of names but also to try to find out more about the fates behind all those names,” said Axel Filges, past president of the German Federal Bar. “Some were able to leave the country after the Nazis came into power, but very many of them were incarcerated or murdered. The non-Jewish German lawyers of those days remained silent. They failed miserably, and so did the lawyers’ organizations. We do not know why.”

After the Berlin bar transformed its research into an exhibition, other regional bars began asking whether they could show it and add their own research. “So, like a puzzle, a portrait of the fate of Jewish lawyers in Germany has emerged step by step,” Filges said.

Related to the exibit, Osgood Hall Law School and The Nathanson Centre will host “Nuremberg at 70: A Commemorative Panel on the Implications of the Trials for Legal and Medical Ethics” on Saturday, November 20, 2015. Speakers include Mélanie Deshaies (Osgoode), Eric Gertner (Ryerson/McCarthy Tétrault), Hengameh Saberi(Osgoode), and Dean Lorne Sossin (Osgoode). The panel will be take place at Osgoode Hall Law School (Ignat Kaneff Building), in Room IKB 2027, 12:30-2:30 pm.

The exhibit is on view in the Library from Monday, November 9, through Sunday, November 22. The hours are Monday to Thursday, from 8:00 am to 10:00 pm; Friday, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm; and Saturday and Sunday, from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm.

Canada Added to the Library of Congress Indigenous Law Portal

Law Library of CongressThis is a wonderful gift from our neighbours to the south. On June 21, in celebration of our National Aboriginal Day, the Law Library of Congress opened the Canadian portion of their Indigenous Law Portal, expanding the portal’s coverage for the first time beyond the United States. The Canadian portion of the Indigenous Law Portal is divided into three regions: Eastern, Western, and Northern Canada.  These regions closely follow the recently updated K Class – Law Classification.  There is an alphabetical master list of Individual First Nation, Inuit and Métis peoples. The list can also be browsed can be accessed from one  of , or browsed either by region or by province.

National Aboriginal Day began in 1996. A Proclamation declaring June 21 of each year as National Aboriginal Day made the summer solstice, June 21, a day to recognize the heritage, culture, and achievements of Canada’s indigenous peoples. National Aboriginal Day is the first of the a series of national celebrations, followed by Saint Jean-Baptiste Day (La Fête nationale du Québec) on June 24 and Canada Day on July 1.

Read more on the Law Library of Congress’s blog post.