Canada Added to the Library of Congress Indigenous Law Portal

Law Library of CongressThis is a wonderful gift from our neighbours to the south. On June 21, in celebration of our National Aboriginal Day, the Law Library of Congress opened the Canadian portion of their Indigenous Law Portal, expanding the portal’s coverage for the first time beyond the United States. The Canadian portion of the Indigenous Law Portal is divided into three regions: Eastern, Western, and Northern Canada.  These regions closely follow the recently updated K Class – Law Classification.  There is an alphabetical master list of Individual First Nation, Inuit and Métis peoples. The list can also be browsed can be accessed from one  of , or browsed either by region or by province.

National Aboriginal Day began in 1996. A Proclamation declaring June 21 of each year as National Aboriginal Day made the summer solstice, June 21, a day to recognize the heritage, culture, and achievements of Canada’s indigenous peoples. National Aboriginal Day is the first of the a series of national celebrations, followed by Saint Jean-Baptiste Day (La Fête nationale du Québec) on June 24 and Canada Day on July 1.

Read more on the Law Library of Congress’s blog post.

 

The Jarvis-Irving Collection

Samuel Jarvis, 1792-1857

Samuel Jarvis, 1792-1857

In several separate purchases over the past year, the Osgoode Library has managed to acquire a collection of law books, the Jarvis-Irving Collection, comprising 32 titles (67 volumes) that belonged to Samuel Peters Jarvis (1792-1857), a lawyer and prominent Toronto citizen and member of the Family Compact in Upper Canada.

Jarvis was born in Newark (now Niagara-on-the-Lake) in 1792, when it was the capital of the colony of Upper Canada. His father, William Jarvis, enjoyed the patronage of Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe, who granted him the offices of provincial secretary and registrar. Samuel Jarvis was educated at Reverend  John Strachan‘s Grammar School in Cornwall, after which he took up legal studies in the office of Attorney General William Firth. His articles were interrupted by the War of 1812, in which he saw considerable action, including service with Major-General Sir Isaac Brock at the capture of Detroit and at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He was called to Bar in 1815.

Though from an established family and well-positioned for success, Jarvis’s fiery temperament and impetuous nature initially thwarted his chances at preferment. In 1817, he killed John Ridout, son of Surveyor General Thomas Ridout, in a duel, though he was later exonerated. In 1826, with a group of other Tory young bloods, he invaded and ransacked the offices of William Lyon Mackenzie, an offence for which he was heavily fined. Despite these blots on his character, Jarvis was appointed deputy provincial secretary and registrar by Lieutenant Governor Sir Peregrine Maitland in 1827, and subsequently Chief Superintendent of Indian Affairs by Lieutenant Governor Sir Francis Bond Head in 1837. Jarvis did not prove a great success in either of these roles. After several investigations into mismanagement, the office of Chief Superintendent was abolished in in 1845 and Jarvis, in disgrace, retired to private life. Faced with financial problems, he subdivided and sold off most of the 100-acre park east of Yonge Street in Toronto that he had inherited from his father. In 1847, Hazelburn, the house he had built there 23 years earlier, was torn town to make way for for the street which still bears Jarvis’s name. Jarvis died in 1857.

This collection is called the Jarvis-Irving Collection, as it was subsequently passed on to Jarvis’s daughter-in-law’s brother, Sir Aemilius Irving (1823-1913), the longest-serving Treasurer of the Law Society of Upper Canada. We are extremely proud of this collection, as it is rare to be able to rebuild such a substantial collection of law books from so early a period in our national and legal history.

New HeinOnline Library: Religion and the Law

heinonline_logo The Osgoode Library now subscribes to the new library in HeinOnline: Religion and the Law. Consisting of more than 1,200 titles and 600,000 pages that include books, periodicals, and bibliographies, this collection provides a research platform for the development, history, organization, and fundamental principles of various world religions. The collection also includes the Christian Legal Society publications, an assortment of Canon Law, and rare historical bibles. This collection will grow considerably as additional new material is added in the future.

Currently, this new collection features works on:

  • Canon Law
  • History of the Church & State
  • Religion & Freedom
  • Jewish Law
  • Reformation Period
  • Early Constitutions of the Church
  • Religion & Politics
  • The Bible in Public Schools
  • And More!

Like other specialist topical libraries on HeinOnline, the Library includes scholarly articles assembled from HeinOnline’s extensive holdings of law journals, as well as digitzed scholarly texts and a custom bibliography. For more information about the library, click here.

New Law Journal from Thomson Rivers: Canadian Journal of Comparative and Contemporary Law

CJCCL-logoThe new Canadian Journal of Comparative and Contemporary Law (CJCCL) was launched in 2013 at Thompson Rivers University, Faculty of Law (TRU Law). The inaugural issue was published just last month (January 2015). This issue has for its theme “Health Law and Human Rights”, focusing on the interrelationship between health law and human rights and featuring contributions from nationally and internationally acclaimed scholars in the field including a Foreword by Osgoode’s own Dean Lorne Sossin. The thematic focus of the CJCCL’s second issue, to be published in January 2016 will be “Equity in the 21st Century: Problems and Perspectives”.  For further details, visit the journal’s submissions page.

The CJCCL is an open access journal. Articles may be downloaded from the journal’s website free of charge. CJCCL articles will be also accessible through HeinOnline, Westlaw and Google Scholar. At least one volume will be published annually.

The CJCCL aims to establish itself as a top-rated academic publication. Its mandate is to publish rigorous, innovative scholarship that makes a significant contribution to legal study. The CJCCL’s Editors in Chief select a specific theme that will be the focus of each year’s issue, facilitating a penetrating analysis of a particular legal topic to a greater degree than other, general interest academic law reviews. Contributors are also encouraged to take a comparative approach in their scholarship.

TRU Law and the editors of the CJCCL are to be congratulated on this landmark event in the life of their new law school and for their significant contribution to Canadian legal scholarship.

New Content on HeinOnline (January 2015 Update)

heinonline_logoHere’s a shapshot of new and updated content added to HeinOnline last month, January 2015. Click the links for more detail on each library’s additions and updates.

  • Law Journal Library:
    • American Indian Journal
    • Anaele Universitatii din Bucuresti: Seria Drept
    • Curierul Judiciar
    • Information & Communications Technology Law
    • International Journal of the Legal Profession
    • Journal of Indian Law and Society
    • Journal of International Wildlife and Policy
    • Ocean Development and International Law
    • Philippine Law and Society Review
  • New Bar Journal: West Virginia State Bar News: (1950-1975)
  • 75 new titles added to Legal Classics, including:
    • Infants Lawyer: Or, the Law (Ancient and Modern) Relating to Infants
  • 875 new titles added to U.S. Congressional Documents, including:
  • 5 new titles added to U.S. Federal Agency Documents, including:
    • Annual Report of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (2000-2014)
  • 73 new titles added to U.S. Federal Legislative History Library, including:
    • Legislative History of the Civil Rights Act of 1957: P.L. 85-315
    • Legislative History of the Civil Rights Act of 1960: P.L. 86-449
    • Legislative History of the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994: P.L. 103-328
  • 2 new titles and 3 updates added to the State Reports: A Historical Archive, including:
    • Cases Determined by the St. Louis, Kansas City and Springfield Courts of Appeals of the State of Missouri (1910-1954)
    • Reports of Cases Heard and Determined in the Supreme Court of Rhode Island
  • 6 new titles added to Women & the Law, including:
    • Feminism and Legal Theory Project at 30: A Workshop on Geographies of Violence: Place, Space, and Time
    • Feminism and Legal Theory Project at 30: A Workshop on Labor and Employment
  • 3 new titles added to the World Treaty Library, including:
    • Complete Collection of All the Marine Treaties Subsisting between Great-Britain and France, Spain, Portugal, Austria, Denmark, Sweden, Savoy, Holland, Morocco, Algiers, Tripoli, Tunis, etc.
  • 13 new titles added to the World Trials Library, including:
    • Eichmann Kommandos
    • Eichmann: Technician of Death
    • Eichmann: The Man and His Crimes
    • Case of Elizabeth Canning Fairly Stated
  • 1 new title added to the Hague Academy of Collected Courses Update:
    • Volume 368: The Law of Global Governance by Eyal Benvenisti

 

Art in the Osgoode Law Library (1): Roy Kiyooka, Homage to Ben Nicholson, 1967

We thought we’d start the new year with a new series of posts on the artworks that can be seen in the Osgoode Hall Law School Library. We thought we’d start with this piece, the largest in the library, which hangs prominently near library entrance, dominating the stairway between the library’s two floors.

Roy Kiyooka (1926-1994)
Homage to Ben Nicholson, 1967
acrylic on canvas
Collection of York University
Purchased from the artist

Kiyooka: Homage to Ben Nicholson

Kiyooka: Homage to Ben Nicholson (credit: Bernard Sandler, Osgoode PD)

Roy Kiyooka was a second-generation Japanese Canadian artist, poet and photographer, born in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, in 1926. He grew up in the Prairies and studied art in Calgary and Regina. He moved to Vancouver 1959, already an accomplished respected painter. Here he challenged a generation of artists to move beyond regional styles and seek inspiration from international art currents. In the late 1960s, he rejected painting and began writing poetry and taking photographs. As a part of the rejection of a modernist aesthetic, he eventually took up performance, film, and music. Kiyooka was one of Canada’s first interdisciplinary artists and was highly influential in Vancouver’s bustling cultural scene. He was awarded the Order of Canada in 1978, not only in recognition of his work as a painter but for his significant contribution as a teacher. Kiyooka died in Vancouver in 1994.

Homage to Ben Nicholson, the painting in the Osgoode Library, was among Roy Kiyooka’s last paintings. While he was painting, Kiyooka worked in the hard-edged modernism of the New York avant-garde of the time, just as the artist referred to in the title, Ben Nicholson, had popularized the spare formalism of Constructivism in Britain before him.

The painting is a triptych of three identical panels, each five square. Across the surface of the painting, slight differences in paint application distinguish the oval forms from the serene blue ground. The subtleties of colour here are typical of Kiyooka, but the punctuating orange framing the painting allows for the levitation of the blue, while reinforcing the fundamental objectivity of the painting by counteracting the use of a conventional frame. While a viewer might infer the wide blue sweep of a Pacific vista, a concern for the painting as closed formal world, rather than a system of representation, was a defining principle of the New York modernism to which Kiyooka responded. His international modernist vision in 1960s Vancouver, a city at the time overwhelmed with regionalist attention to particulars of place and landscape, secured the artist a place in the São Paolo Biennale of 1966.

A film about Kiyooka’s life was produced in 2012. REED: The Life and Works of Roy Kiyooka follows the radical times in which the artist lived, from the Beat Era to the turmoil of the 60s and redress for Japanese Canadians in the 1980s. It is an extraordinary tribute to a great artist, showing a broad spectrum of his work while revealing the personal and social history that inspired him. A trailer for the film can be viewed here.

This painting is appropriate to Osgoode for a number of reasons. The painting’s modernism is contemporary with and a reflection of the spirit that saw Osgoode move from it’s staid quarters in old Osgoode Hall on Queen Street to the new campus of York University. The painting was painted in 1967, the centennial year of Canadian Confederation and also the year the new Osgoode Hall Law School was designed. The law school finally opened at York 1969.

The painting is on permanent loan to Osgoode Hall Law School from the Collection of York University.

Kiyooka in the Library Staircase

Kiyooka in the Library Staircase

New Content on HeinOnline (December 2014 Update)

heinonline_logoHere’s a listing of additions and updates to the contents of HeinOnline in December 2014. Click the links for more detail on each library’s additions and updates.