Perfect Timing

Just to give you something to look forward to when you’ve finished your exams and papers, the library will have four especially interesting-sounding books available for your reading enjoyment by April 30.

First on the list is The Emergency Sasquatch Ordinance and other real laws that human beings have actually dreamed up, enacted, and sometimes even enforced, which is a collection of over 200 real but “wacky” laws, complete with citations.  This book is Osgoode’s first book with sasquatch content, but fear not, other libraries in the York University Library system will be able to meet your sasquatch research needs, with nearly twenty titles from which to choose.

The next book is again a first at Osgoode: The Little Book of Elvis Law.  The book talks of the license agreements respecting the use of his name and likeness in connection with the marketing and sale of consumer goods, the many paternity suits and recording contracts, cases involving Priscilla Presley, a bar called The Velvet Elvis, a death certificate investigation, a 16-hour-long documentary, a magazine photo spread, and an agreement with television host Geraldo Rivera.  If that does not sate your curiosity, again YUL will come to your rescue with another 50 titles on The King, including (electronic) FBI records!

Thirdly, for the sports-minded, we are getting Adventure and the Law, about the law relating to extreme sports.  We already do have a handful of books in the library’s sports law collection, but Scott and Steacie win in the extreme sports division.

The last book is already in the stacks: Canada the Good : A Short History of Vice Since 1500.  If this piques your interest, Osgoode and the rest of YUL do have several other items on vice control in Canada.  Here is part of its description:

This historical synthesis demonstrates how moral regulation has changed over time, how it has shaped Canadians’ lives, why some debates have almost disappeared and others persist, and why some individuals and groups have felt empowered to tackle collective social issues. Against the background of the evolution of the state, the enlargement of the body politic, and mounting forays into court activism, the author illustrates the complexity over time of various forms of social regulation and the control of vice.

Enjoy!

 

 

More E-books Developments

Some of the library’s e-books are provided to us through Scholars Portal.  The way to access the Scholars Portal books is different from the way we access books on the ebrary platform.  You can tell that the book is a Scholars Portal e-book if you see “Borrow this E-Book” above the cover image of a Scholars Portal Books book.

You will need to follow a specific process to download the e-book onto your personal computer or device.  It will not work on a public computer, and you cannot browse the book before downloading it:

  1. Download a program that supports Adobe IDs:
  2. Create an AdobeID if you don’t already have one.
  3. On the Scholars Portal page for the book, click the orange “Borrow this E-Book” text then the blue “Download your book here” button.
  4. Then a file ending in the extension .acsm will download. This file should automatically open in Adobe Digital Editions, but if it doesn’t, right click on the file and choose “Open with…” then Adobe Digital Editions.

Your book will now open in Adobe Digital Editions. After 72 hours, it will be returned automatically.  You may return it earlier if you finish with it sooner.

For more general information on e-book platforms, see this campus guide.

The Digital Rights Management restrictions on the Scholars Portal e-books vary and are not always the same as the restrictions on the ebrary books.  The Scholars Portal books:

1.         Must be borrowed in their entirety, not just a chapter at a time.

2.         Cannot be browsed (i.e. must be checked out to look at; no partial downloading for the bit you want).

3.         Can only be used by one person at a time (single-user access) unless the catalogue says we have more than one “copy.”

4.         Are checked out for 72 hours (3 days) at a time, at which point the book disappears along with any highlighting and any annotations you may have made on it.

5.         May be renewed.

6.         Cannot be placed on hold.

7.         Cannot all be printed; some books can only be read (depends on what exact type of licence they have, which is not easy to determine). For books that permit printing, the maximum amount allowed is 20%.

8.         Need to be used with a reader that is compatible with Adobe Content Server (ACS), because books are not PDFs (see point no. 1 in the first list).  There should be a prompt from the reader to do this.  The e-book can be read by you on multiple devices if it is downloaded and opened under the same Adobe ID.  You have to be careful, though, because an Adobe ID can only be used on a maximum of 6 devices ever.  If you are on a public computer, and find one of these books to check out, e-mail the .acsm file to yourself to check it out on your own device.

Troubleshooting and Miscellaneous

1.   If it says “unable to download: already fulfilled by another user” someone else has already downloaded and opened the book.

2.   If it says “unable to download: already returned” you may have accidentally returned it: refreshing should bring it back.

3.   When you are in, you have a reading panel and a library shelf.  The ribbon says if your book has expired. For unexpired books, click on the ribbon to see the time remaining for the book.  It also says what rights you have to print/copy the book and has the button for returning the book before it is due.  If you click on a book and get an “unable to return: bad loan” message you are trying to return a book that has already been returned.  If the book has expired, you have to start from scratch to borrow it again.

4.   The most common problem people have is using Adobe Acrobat Reader instead of Adobe Digital Editions.

5.   Sometimes people using Chrome or Bluefire encounter problems.

6.   LibAnswers has answers to a number of users’ questions – select “borrowable e-books” from the topics dropdown).

7.  There is a handout on downloading Adobe Digital Editions etc. from LibAnwers.

Change of Martinus Nijhoff Imprint

Martinus Nijhoff was the name of a prestigious publishing house founded in the 19th century in The Hague. (The Dutch poet bearing the same name was a grandson of the company’s founder). Martinus Nijhoff’s publishing program focused on the humanities and the, with an especially strong list for law. Nijhoff’s publishing record of extremely well produced and edited and widely-respected titles in both international and humanitarian law is commendable.

In the 1970’s the Nijhoff publishing house was acquired by Kluwer. Within Kluwer, the imprint Martinus Nijhoff Publishers was retained for its publication program in international law, human rights law, humanitarian law and international relations.

In 2003, the Martinus Nijhoff imprint was acquried from Kluwer by Brill. Since its beginnings in 1683, Brill has been based in Leiden, home of the oldest university in the Netherlands. Founded during the golden age of Dutch history and culture, Brill has had a rich publishing history, including the publication of Bayle’s influential Dictionnaire Historique et Critique, the inception of one of the first scholarly journals in Chinese studies T’oung Pao, the publication of the Nag Hammadi codices for UNESCO and a wealth of other major scholarly reference works.

When the Martinus Nijhoff Publishers program came to Brill from Kluwer in 2003, MNP was retained as one of Brill’s imprints and 2013 marked the 10th anniversary of that association. During this time, the Law publishing program developed into an important part of the overall Brill portfolio. Concomitant with the introduction of the new typographic style, the Martinus Nijhoff Publishers logo and branding will gradually be replaced by Brill Nijhoffin all books, journals, and associated marketing sites and materials.

Recent International Law Acquisitions

The library has been busy lately augmenting its International Law collection.

The London Review of International Law is a brand new journal from Oxford (Volume 1 Issue 1 was published September 2013) to which we now have access.  It is not available through the catalogue or eResources yet, but it will be.

We have also acquired the comparative and international law handbooks available through Oxford Handbooks Online (Law): The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Law; The Oxford Handbook of International Investment Law; The Oxford Handbook of International Trade Law; The Oxford Handbook of International Environmental Law; The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law; and The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law.

As well, we subscribe to the Oxford Scholarly Authorities on International Law, which includes the Oxford Reports on International Law, and we have acquired the Brill collection of International Law e-books.

The International Law Association has just published its Index of the Reports of Conferences, and we have added a copy to our collection.  The ILA has been holding conferences biennially for 140 years and the Index allows those who wish to follow the development of international law over that time to find the reports, recommendations, draft conventions, guidelines, model laws and best practices presented by scholars and practitioners at those conferences.

According to the ILA’s website:

The ILA was founded in Brussels in 1873 and its objectives are “the study, clarification and development of international law, both public and private, and the furtherance of international understanding and respect for international law”. The ILA has consultative status as an international non-governmental organisation with a number of the United Nations specialised agencies.

 

Its objectives are pursued primarily through the work of its International Committees, and the focal point of its activities is the series of Biennial Conferences. The Conferences, of which 74 have so far been held in different locations throughout the world, provide a forum for the comprehensive discussion and endorsement of the work of the Committees.

The Index is divided into three parts: the list of conferences from 1873 to 2010 (the 2012 conference is not included in the Index, but is in the Hein collection), the index of subjects, and the index of authors and presenters.  The subject index is extensive and easy to use.  It refers the user to the conference number and the page numbers in that conference’s materials where the subject is discussed.

After consulting the Index, the ILA’s conference materials are available online through HeinOnline’s  Foreign and International Law Service (1873-2012).  The library also has print copies from the conferences of 1988 to 2010, and the electronic database, Making of Modern Law, has the Transactions of the ILA from 1873 to 1924.

Happy researching!

 

Halsbury’s Laws of Canada Now Complete

LexisNexis Canada recently celebrated the completion of the first edition of Halsbury’s Laws of Canada with the publication of the 77th and final volume this past February. Halsbury’s Canada began publication in 2006 with the volume on Conflict of Laws by Osgoode’s own Janet Walker. Now complete,Halsbury’s covers 117 legal subjects from all 14 Canadian jurisdictions, making it the only truly national legal encyclopedia, providing an authoritative, reliable and elegant statement of Canadian law.

Halsbury’s Laws of Canada is available both in print (in the Osgoode Library’s Core Collection) and also online as part of the LexisNexis Quicklaw legal information service. For more information about this signal event in Canadian law publishing, please see the press release here.

A new take on book “vendors”

Photo by Stephen Fowler via BlogTO

As librarians, part of our day-to-day responsibilities involve dealing with vendors who provide resources to us, the library, to pass along to you, the patrons. This is a big business, as anybody who has ever been to a major library conference and seen the impressive displays and salesmanship on offer. This all highlights the impressively idiosyncratic twist on the idea of a book vendor that is has been established by impressively idiosyncratic Toronto book store the Monkey’s Paw – an actual vending machine that dispenses completely random books.

Called the Bibliomat, the vending machine will dispense a book for a mere toonie, with the catch being that you will not know what you’ll be getting until you buy it and it spits out your new purchase. Given the nature of the bookstore (which is to say, a very unusual but well-curated selection of ephemera), it is safe to say that it is unlikely that it will be something that you own already.

Check out a video of the machine at work here:

The BIBLIO-MAT from Craig Small on Vimeo.

 

Canadian Journal of Human Rights

The first issue of the Canadian Journal of Human Rights has just recently been published. The CJHR is a new academic journal from the Robson Hall Faculty of Law of the University of Manitoba. An interdisciplinary, peer-reviwed journal of human rights law and policy with a national and international scope, it is the first and only journal of its kind in Canada.

As the Canadian Museum for Human Rights nears completion in Winnipeg, the CJHR seeks to attract human rights research from around the world. Its editors are committed to exploring varied areas of research from diverse perspectives — from queer rights in Africa and Aboriginal rights in Australia to the European Court of Human Rights and Human Rights tribunals in Canada.

In addition to being available open-access on the web (for which its editors are to be commended), the journal is also available on HeinOnline.