New HeinOnline Resources Added to the Catalogue


Approximately 3,600 new resources available via HeinOnline have been loaded to the library catalogue as follows:

HeinOnline Core Collection 12 new titles
American Indian Law Collection 2 new titles
Foreign Relations of the U.S. 4 new title
History of International Law 16 new titles
Law Journal Library 29 new titles
Scottish Legal History 2 new titles
Subject Comilations of State Laws 47 new titles
U.S. Congressional Documents 1,023 new titles
U.S. Federal Legislative History Library 129 new titles
Women and the Law (Peggy) 21 new titles
World Constitutions Illustrated: Contemporary & Historical Documents & Resources 2,251 new titles
World Trials Library 90 new titles

New HeinOnline Resources Added to the Catalogue


Approximately 3,600 new resources available via HeinOnline have been loaded to the library catalogue as follows:

HeinOnline Core Collection 138 new titles
American Indian Law Collection 7 new titles
Foreign Relations of the U.S. 4 new title
History of International Law 63 new titles
Law Journal Library 35 new titles
U.S. Congressional Documents 2,581 new titles
Women and the Law (Peggy) 773 new titles
World Trials Library 4 new titles

BC Laws & Legislative Documents — Now Comprehensive and Free on the Web

British Columbia laws and legislative documents, once available only in the content-rich and highly functional but subscription-based service called QP LegalEze, is now available to everyone free on the web in a new service called BC Laws. We congratulate the BC Queen’s Printer on this exciting development, another landmark example of Canadian leadership in the open law and open data movements.

BC Laws has been upgraded to provide enhanced searching and more content including historical legislation and related publications. All content is delivered in an “open data format” and restrictions on commercial and non-commercial use of the data have been changed (read more). Contents, all full-text searchable, include:

Access to the BC Gazette, Parts 1 & 2, as well as Point-in-Time tables for all statutes, are coming soon.

If freer access to primary law were not good enough, the content on BC Laws – all of it – is delivered as open data, under a Queen’s Printer License. The license enables, among other activities, full and partial content reuse and publication for commercial and non-commercial purposes, subject to appropriate conditions. To this end, the Queen’s Printer has also released access to the API underlying BC Laws.

Thanks to our colleague Kim Nayyer at the University of Victoria, Diana M. Priestly Law Library, for bringing this to our attention.

 

Oxford Handbooks Online

The Osgoode Library has acquired the complete collection of law-related Oxford Handbooks Online and the records for the individual titles have been uploaded to the online library catalogue.

Oxford Handbooks Online brings together the world’s leading scholars to write review essays that evaluate the current thinking on a field or topic, and make an original argument about the future direction of the debate. The Oxford Handbooks are one of the most successful and cited series within scholarly publishing, containing in-depth, high-level articles by scholars at the top of their field and for the first time. In addition to law, there are 13 other subject areas covered by the Handbooks: a complete list is available here. The Handbooks website also provides an online training demo illustrating the features and functions of the service.

Now that Osgoode has acquired the law-related Handbooks, the complete collection is available online here at York University Libraries.

More E-books Developments

Some of the library’s e-books are provided to us through Scholars Portal.  The way to access the Scholars Portal books is different from the way we access books on the ebrary platform.  You can tell that the book is a Scholars Portal e-book if you see “Borrow this E-Book” above the cover image of a Scholars Portal Books book.

You will need to follow a specific process to download the e-book onto your personal computer or device.  It will not work on a public computer, and you cannot browse the book before downloading it:

  1. Download a program that supports Adobe IDs:
  2. Create an AdobeID if you don’t already have one.
  3. On the Scholars Portal page for the book, click the orange “Borrow this E-Book” text then the blue “Download your book here” button.
  4. Then a file ending in the extension .acsm will download. This file should automatically open in Adobe Digital Editions, but if it doesn’t, right click on the file and choose “Open with…” then Adobe Digital Editions.

Your book will now open in Adobe Digital Editions. After 72 hours, it will be returned automatically.  You may return it earlier if you finish with it sooner.

For more general information on e-book platforms, see this campus guide.

The Digital Rights Management restrictions on the Scholars Portal e-books vary and are not always the same as the restrictions on the ebrary books.  The Scholars Portal books:

1.         Must be borrowed in their entirety, not just a chapter at a time.

2.         Cannot be browsed (i.e. must be checked out to look at; no partial downloading for the bit you want).

3.         Can only be used by one person at a time (single-user access) unless the catalogue says we have more than one “copy.”

4.         Are checked out for 72 hours (3 days) at a time, at which point the book disappears along with any highlighting and any annotations you may have made on it.

5.         May be renewed.

6.         Cannot be placed on hold.

7.         Cannot all be printed; some books can only be read (depends on what exact type of licence they have, which is not easy to determine). For books that permit printing, the maximum amount allowed is 20%.

8.         Need to be used with a reader that is compatible with Adobe Content Server (ACS), because books are not PDFs (see point no. 1 in the first list).  There should be a prompt from the reader to do this.  The e-book can be read by you on multiple devices if it is downloaded and opened under the same Adobe ID.  You have to be careful, though, because an Adobe ID can only be used on a maximum of 6 devices ever.  If you are on a public computer, and find one of these books to check out, e-mail the .acsm file to yourself to check it out on your own device.

Troubleshooting and Miscellaneous

1.   If it says “unable to download: already fulfilled by another user” someone else has already downloaded and opened the book.

2.   If it says “unable to download: already returned” you may have accidentally returned it: refreshing should bring it back.

3.   When you are in, you have a reading panel and a library shelf.  The ribbon says if your book has expired. For unexpired books, click on the ribbon to see the time remaining for the book.  It also says what rights you have to print/copy the book and has the button for returning the book before it is due.  If you click on a book and get an “unable to return: bad loan” message you are trying to return a book that has already been returned.  If the book has expired, you have to start from scratch to borrow it again.

4.   The most common problem people have is using Adobe Acrobat Reader instead of Adobe Digital Editions.

5.   Sometimes people using Chrome or Bluefire encounter problems.

6.   LibAnswers has answers to a number of users’ questions – select “borrowable e-books” from the topics dropdown).

7.  There is a handout on downloading Adobe Digital Editions etc. from LibAnwers.

Spring has sprung – now start studying!

The reality of exams dawns…

It’s the first day of spring (just don’t look outside), and of course that means that if you haven’t started to feel the end-of-term crunch, you will (and probably should!) very soon.

Of course, the library should be a major focal point for your study and research (if it’s not, for shame!), and we’re here to help. This post is intended as a capsule-sized survivor’s guide to the basics needed to get through the home stretch.

Our extended hours will start the week of March 31st, 2014 and go until Friday, April 25th. We will switch to summer hours on Monday, April 28th. The extended hours will be until 11 p.m. every night. As a result, our hours are will run from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. from Monday to Friday and from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

Reference hours will remain unchanged, so if you wish to speak with a reference librarian at the reference desk, our usual reference hours are Monday to Friday from 10 am to 4 pm. It is also possible to make an appointment to speak with one of us outside of those hours, but in such cases please make an appointment, either by dropping by the desk or by e-mailing us – either personally or via the library e-mail at library@osgoode.yorku.ca. That e-mail is the same one you should use if you have a reference question that hits you at 3:30 in the morning. It will be handled when the desk is opened the next business day.

No food, crunchy or otherwise, is allowed. However, drinks in a lidded container are fine. Coffee is the life-blood of stressed law students, and we will not stand in your way of caffeinated highs. Just remember that sleep is just as important (but please, try and go home to catch it). Speaking from personal experience, law exams are ten times worse if you’re overly tired, so some shut-eye is crucially important!

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask. We’re here to help you out, answer questions, and hopefully soothe frayed nerves!

Good luck everybody!