More E-books Developments

Some of the library’s e-books are provided to us through Scholars Portal.  The way to access the Scholars Portal books is different from the way we access books on the ebrary platform.  You can tell that the book is a Scholars Portal e-book if you see “Borrow this E-Book” above the cover image of a Scholars Portal Books book.

You will need to follow a specific process to download the e-book onto your personal computer or device.  It will not work on a public computer, and you cannot browse the book before downloading it:

  1. Download a program that supports Adobe IDs:
  2. Create an AdobeID if you don’t already have one.
  3. On the Scholars Portal page for the book, click the orange “Borrow this E-Book” text then the blue “Download your book here” button.
  4. Then a file ending in the extension .acsm will download. This file should automatically open in Adobe Digital Editions, but if it doesn’t, right click on the file and choose “Open with…” then Adobe Digital Editions.

Your book will now open in Adobe Digital Editions. After 72 hours, it will be returned automatically.  You may return it earlier if you finish with it sooner.

For more general information on e-book platforms, see this campus guide.

The Digital Rights Management restrictions on the Scholars Portal e-books vary and are not always the same as the restrictions on the ebrary books.  The Scholars Portal books:

1.         Must be borrowed in their entirety, not just a chapter at a time.

2.         Cannot be browsed (i.e. must be checked out to look at; no partial downloading for the bit you want).

3.         Can only be used by one person at a time (single-user access) unless the catalogue says we have more than one “copy.”

4.         Are checked out for 72 hours (3 days) at a time, at which point the book disappears along with any highlighting and any annotations you may have made on it.

5.         May be renewed.

6.         Cannot be placed on hold.

7.         Cannot all be printed; some books can only be read (depends on what exact type of licence they have, which is not easy to determine). For books that permit printing, the maximum amount allowed is 20%.

8.         Need to be used with a reader that is compatible with Adobe Content Server (ACS), because books are not PDFs (see point no. 1 in the first list).  There should be a prompt from the reader to do this.  The e-book can be read by you on multiple devices if it is downloaded and opened under the same Adobe ID.  You have to be careful, though, because an Adobe ID can only be used on a maximum of 6 devices ever.  If you are on a public computer, and find one of these books to check out, e-mail the .acsm file to yourself to check it out on your own device.

Troubleshooting and Miscellaneous

1.   If it says “unable to download: already fulfilled by another user” someone else has already downloaded and opened the book.

2.   If it says “unable to download: already returned” you may have accidentally returned it: refreshing should bring it back.

3.   When you are in, you have a reading panel and a library shelf.  The ribbon says if your book has expired. For unexpired books, click on the ribbon to see the time remaining for the book.  It also says what rights you have to print/copy the book and has the button for returning the book before it is due.  If you click on a book and get an “unable to return: bad loan” message you are trying to return a book that has already been returned.  If the book has expired, you have to start from scratch to borrow it again.

4.   The most common problem people have is using Adobe Acrobat Reader instead of Adobe Digital Editions.

5.   Sometimes people using Chrome or Bluefire encounter problems.

6.   LibAnswers has answers to a number of users’ questions – select “borrowable e-books” from the topics dropdown).

7.  There is a handout on downloading Adobe Digital Editions etc. from LibAnwers.

Internet Archive (Re)Launches Open Library

The Internet Archive has recently launched there redesigned Open Library. The Open Library now makes over one million books available to all and in a new format that is designed to support the “print disabled … those who are blind, dyslexic or are otherwise visually impaired.”

The print disabled collection of books are now available through the Archive’s new Open Library site (www.openlibrary.org), which serves as a gateway to information about millions of hardcopy books and more than 1 million electronic books.

In a recent Twitter post Rob Richards (@richards1000) pointed out the wealth of legal materials available on the Open Library.
Looks like this continues to develop into a very valuable resource.

[07May2010: More information on the Open Library redesign has been posted today. They note that, “This is a “soft launch,” our very first release at a new take on the Open Library system. There will be things that seem a bit weird, particularly if you’ve used the previous version. We’re fairly sure that all the major operations work though, so if you find something that’s broken, or would like to suggest an improvement or discuss something, we’re all ears!]

Two New eResources from Oxford University Press Now Available

The library has just acquired two new online resources from Oxford University Press: the Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History and the collection of law books published by OUP available on Oxford Scholarship Online.

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History, edited by Stanley N. Katz, is the first encyclopedia of law to provide both historical and contemporary comparisons of the world’s legal systems. A truly international and interdisciplinary reference work, the Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History covers legal history from ancient to modern times. Approximately 1,000 articles explore the traditions of Ancient Greek Law, Ancient Roman Law, Medieval Roman Law, Chinese Law, English Common Law, Islamic Law, United States Law, and the laws of such other regions as Africa, Latin America, and South Asia. Major categories of law explained in detail include private law (contract, tort, civil procedure), public law (statutory, criminal, etc.), and higher or constitutional law.

The Law module of Oxford Scholarship Online provides access to the full text of some 200 titles from Oxford University Press’s current academic law list. Oxford has a strong tradition of developing exceptional work across the full breadth of legal scholarship, with titles ranging from the foundations of legal history and philosophy to analytic and comparative work on legal doctrine and empirical research on law in modern society. Oxford Scholarship Online will include new titles from the series: Oxford Studies in European Law, Oxford Monographs in International Law, Oxford Monographs in Criminal Law and Justice, Clarendon Studies in Criminology, Oxford Monographs in Labour Law, Oxford Studies in Modern Legal History, Oxford Studies in International Economic Law, and the International Courts and Tribunals series, alongside many other works selected from their list of law titles. For a full list of the titles currently available in this ever-expanding collection, click
here.

FYI — At York University, we have access to the full range of subjects available on Oxford Scholarship Online. To access this new service, click here.

‘Future of Reputation’ Now Available Online

Daniel J. Solove’s book The Future of Reputation: Gossip, Rumor, and Privacy on the Internet, published in 2007 by Yale University Press, is now available online under a Creative Commons license.

This book will take a journey through the ways in which private lives are being exposed online, and it will examine the implications. People have profound new ways to communicate, yet the gossip, shaming, and rumors that are being spread online are sometimes having devastating effects on people’s lives. Should we do something to stop the exposure of private secrets on the Internet? Can we do anything? In this book I will propose a framework for how we can address these problems—by recognizing a new and broader notion of privacy and by reaching a better balance between privacy and free speech.”–Introduction

Also available in the library at K 3264 C65 S65 2007.