Lexis Advance Quicklaw training

Not sure how to use the new Lexis Advance Quicklaw effectively?

The Library is offering Lexis Advance Quicklaw training next Monday, Sept. 26 from 12:30 PM. to 2:00 PM. in Room 2011.

Here are some of the new features and functionality that will be highlighted:

– Learn to search Canadian primary and secondary sources using a new design that features a streamlined single intuitive search box.

– Learn how selecting favorite sources or pre-search filters can help narrow your starting point.

– Discover how to search by name, by source or topic, citation or keyword; navigate and refine search results; deliver documents; note up cases and statutes using the quickie Case Citator and the QuickCITE Legislation Citator.

– Discover how the ‘History Content Pod’ can help you streamline your workflow by viewing your search history, search terms, most recently opened documents, allowing you to jump right back into any part of your research.

– See how highlighting and annotating can help you keep track of important and relevant material by saving them to customizable and sharable folders.

– Find out how to access the legal products previously available on CCH Online.

Reserve your spot by emailing library@osgoode.yorku.ca, with Lexis Advance Quicklaw training in the subject line.

Hope to see you there!

Lexis Advance Quicklaw webinar

The library has organized a Lexis Advance Quicklaw webinar on Wednesday February 17th from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Here are some of the new features and functionality that will be highlighted in the webinar:

Learn to search the broadest collection of Canadian primary and secondary sources using a  new design that features a streamlined single intuitive search box allowing you to search as you like. As well, you will learn how selecting favorite sources or pre-search filters can help narrow your starting point.

Discover how to search by name, by source or topic, citation or keyword; navigate and refine search results; deliver documents; note up cases and statutes using the QuickCITE Case Citator and the QuickCITE Legislation Citator.

Discover how the ‘History Content Pod’ can help you streamline your workflow by viewing your search history, search terms, most recently opened documents, or, by viewing a graphical map of your search activities allowing you to jump right back into any part of your research.

See how highlighting and annotating can help you keep track of important and relevant material by saving them to customizable and sharable folders.
Use the following link to register for this session:

https://lexisnexiscanada.webex.com/lexisnexiscanada/k2/j.php?MTID=t87e757dcb4e9f7a2c4ef8cc9fb9151a7

Once you register, you will receive an email invitation to the session which provides all the instructions on how to join the session.  You will only need a computer and a phone to dial into the audio portion.

Some Recently Released Intellectual Property Resources

Michel-Adrien Sheppard, Reference Librarian at the Supreme Court of Canada, alerted us over on sLaw this week to a couple of newly released intellectual property resources.

The first is WIPO Lex a “a one-stop search facility for national laws and treaties on intellectual property (IP) of WIPO, WTO and UN Members.” Searches on the texts of IP laws can be done by: national law (Member combined with subject); browsing Member profile pages; treaty (by organization in combination with the type of treaty and/or subject); or a full text keyword search.

The lists of resources found on the Member’s Profile pages are for legislation that is currently in force, however “the Details page of each text includes information concerning any historical version or related legislation (including their texts). For example, information concerning related texts which amend, repeal or consolidates may be found on the Details page.” The listing for Canada currently provides access to 52 texts including the national laws, implementing rules/regulations, treaty membership information and related links. A directory of IP Offices is also provided.

The second is the historical resource Primary Sources on Copyright (1450-1900) “a digital archive of primary sources on copyright from the invention of the printing press (c. 1450) to the Berne Convention (1886) and beyond”. Development was funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) focusing on key materials from Renaissance Italy (Venice, Rome), France, the German speaking countries, Britain and the United States. National editors for each jurisdiction have selected a core set of documents for there areas providing many additional contextual documents which are linked back to the core materials. An international advisory board also reviewed the selections.

Resources can be accessed by date, place and language with browsing by person on both documents and commentaries. There’s also a static list of key words that is a bit too large to be entirely useful. Fortunately, although not immediately apparent, there is a keyword search (powered by Google) that lets you drill down a little easier. There’s also a very interesting ‘Interactive Timeline Navigation‘ feature that let’s you mouse over the time period and see the number of documents produced for each of the geographical regions.

Accessing individual documents in the database is not entirely intuitive. Clicking on Britain under the Core documents yields a chronological list of resources. Clicking on a date next to the title in this list takes you to the database record (which includes a useful abstract and brief bibliography). To see the document you then click on ‘Images’ which takes you to a document reader with the scanned image along side a transcription (if available). You can then open a larger PDF version of the scanned image for the best view of the original document. Here’s a page from Day’s The Cosmographical Glass, London (1559) for example. Translations are provided for many documents and well researched commentaries with thorough bibliographies are available for the core documents.

As Michel-Adrien says in his post “A Great Month for Online IP Resources“.

Law Library Journal, v. 102, no. 2 Now Available

The latest issue of the Law Library Journal published by the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) is now available online.

Volume 102, Number 2 includes this great set of general articles:

This issue also includes an interesting exchange between Phillip Gragg and Christine L. Sellers in their ‘Back and Forth …’ column on Twitter. Other regular features include Mary Wishner learning from reference practice and Darla W. Jackson thinking about technology tools.

Introductory Webinar for World Constitutions Illustrated

HeinOnline will be introducing World Constitutions Illustrated in a webinar on Thursday, May 6th. There will be two sessions: one in the morning at 10:00am and the second at 2:00pm in the afternoon.

During the webinar we will explain how this library introduces a new legal research platform and how the scope of it is different than the constitutional resources that are currently available elsewhere. We will take a look at the content that is included in the initial release and how to access the various resources available. Lastly, we will briefly describe what you can expect in future releases and describe our overall goal for the project.

For more information and to register follow this link.

New From HeinOnline: World Constitutions Illustrated

HeinOnline has recently launched a new library World Constitutions Illustrated: Contemporary & Historical Documents & Resources.

This library enables legal scholars to research the constitutional and political development of every country in the world. It includes the current constitution for every country in its original language format and an English translation, as well as substantial constitutional histories of the United Kingdom, France, Brazil and Colombia, among others. It also includes constitutional periodicals, more than 800 classic books, other related works such as the World Fact Book, links to scholarly articles and online resources, and bibliographic references.