Recent Acquisitions, February 16 – February 23, 2015

19 new acquisitions in Osgoode Hall Law School Library, including 5 from 2015:

Recent Acquisitions, February 23 – March 2, 2015

2 new acquisitions in Osgoode Hall Law School Library:

New Law Journal from Thomson Rivers: Canadian Journal of Comparative and Contemporary Law

CJCCL-logoThe new Canadian Journal of Comparative and Contemporary Law (CJCCL) was launched in 2013 at Thompson Rivers University, Faculty of Law (TRU Law). The inaugural issue was published just last month (January 2015). This issue has for its theme “Health Law and Human Rights”, focusing on the interrelationship between health law and human rights and featuring contributions from nationally and internationally acclaimed scholars in the field including a Foreword by Osgoode’s own Dean Lorne Sossin. The thematic focus of the CJCCL’s second issue, to be published in January 2016 will be “Equity in the 21st Century: Problems and Perspectives”.  For further details, visit the journal’s submissions page.

The CJCCL is an open access journal. Articles may be downloaded from the journal’s website free of charge. CJCCL articles will be also accessible through HeinOnline, Westlaw and Google Scholar. At least one volume will be published annually.

The CJCCL aims to establish itself as a top-rated academic publication. Its mandate is to publish rigorous, innovative scholarship that makes a significant contribution to legal study. The CJCCL’s Editors in Chief select a specific theme that will be the focus of each year’s issue, facilitating a penetrating analysis of a particular legal topic to a greater degree than other, general interest academic law reviews. Contributors are also encouraged to take a comparative approach in their scholarship.

TRU Law and the editors of the CJCCL are to be congratulated on this landmark event in the life of their new law school and for their significant contribution to Canadian legal scholarship.

Recent Acquisitions, November 10 – February 15, 2015

278 new acquisitions in Osgoode Hall Law School Library, including 27 from 2015:

Refresher sessions for Westlaw, Quicklaw/LexisNexis and CCH Online

Brush up on your online searching skills!

The library is pleased to offer the following training sessions for upper year and graduate students:

  • Westlaw: Wednesday, Feb. 25, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
  • Quicklaw/LexisNexis: Monday, March 2, 12:30 – 2:00 p.m.
  • CCH Online Wednesday March 18, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.

All sessions will take place Room 2011.

To register email library@osgoode.yorku.ca, specifying which session/s you would like to attend.

In the News: An Octocentenary of Note: Magna Carta Turns 800

magna-carta-1215-cotton-augustus

“JOHN, by the grace of God King of England, Lord of Ireland, Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and Count of Anjou, to his archbishops, bishops, abbots, earls, barons, justices, foresters, sheriffs, stewards, servants, and to all his officials and loyal subjects, Greeting.”

In 2015, such an aureate introduction won’t even fit in a tweet. But in 1215, a full eight centuries past, politicians and leaders were not constrained by 140-character limits when they wanted to make a proclamation. King John knew he had ample space on his luxuriously vacant vellum for a loquacious lead-in, and by Jove, he was going to use it.

As John Allemang’s recent (Feb 2) excellent spread in The Globe and Mail reminds us, this year we are celebrating the 800th anniversary of the truly remarkable Magna Carta. In his thoughtful piece, Allemang roundly considers arguments from both Magna Carta’s devotees and detractors, noting that, for all the praise given it for establishing the rule of law and basic tenets of human rights, “sometimes, it is just a self-interested legal document that attempts to settle a bunch of long-simmering quarrels between one very powerful man and a few almost-as-powerful men.” However you choose to view the Magna Carta at 800, for Allemang, its “statement of principle is good enough: Don’t let the bullies push you around.” But enough with the sound-bites; please, read on at The Globe and MailPart I and Part II.

As everyone should know, the Magna Carta — also known as the Great Charter — was signed by King John in the presence of his barons at the field of Runnymede near Windsor on June 15, 1215. There are four extant copies of the Magna Carta: two at the British Library and one each at Salisbury and Lincoln cathedrals. During this octocentenary year, all four copies will be on display at the British Library, which is also hosting an exhibition, “Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy”, from March to September this year. If you find you’re too busy with law school to take a trip to England (an understandable excuse), you can view the exhibition online.

Also as part of this year’s celebrations, a copies of the Magna Carta will be sent on tour around the world. A copy of the Magna Carta from Durham Catheral — a “reissue” from 1216, accompanied by Durham’s 1225 copy of the companion Charter of the Forest — will be on exhibit in Canada from June through December, making stops in four Canadian cities (Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg and Edmonton). Toronto’s Fort York, will be host from October 4 to November 7, 2015. For more information, visit the Magna Carta 800 Canada website.

Coat of Arms of Osgoode Hall Law School

Coat of Arms of Osgoode Hall Law School

The Magna Carta is also features on the coat of arms of Osgoode Hall Law School. On the left side of the shield is portrayed a Doric column surmounted by a crouching beaver. Around the column is a white scroll with the words “Magna Carta Angliae” (Great Charter of England). The beaver, of course, represents Canada. The column and scroll indicate that law, the rule of law and civil rights, descending from Magna Carta, are a pillar of Canadian society. These symbols — the pillar, the beaver and the scroll — are taken directly from the Seal of the Law Society of Upper Canada in Osgoode Hall, the School’s home until 1969.

If you’d like to learn a little more about the Great Charter, a quick search through our holdings reveals numbers of texts and commentaries regarding the eminent document. Our collection includes Blackstone’s famous treatise of 1759.