World Treaty Library: Now Available on HeinOnline

Various efforts have been put forth over the past decades to create a universal collection of all the treaties of the world. Now for the first time, through the cooperation of Tufts University, Brill Publishing, the United Nations and various others, you will be able to search across all the major treaties in the world in one database: the new World Treaty Library on HeinOnline. We have a campus-wide licence for this new database and it can be accessed by everyone in the York University community.

This monumental collection brings together works from Rohn, Dumont, Wiktor, and Martens to create the richest collection of world treaties ever available, covering the time period from 1648 to the present. Altogether, more than 160,000 treaty records have been identified. Through in-depth indexing of all the treaties and cross citation linking, Hein has created a powerhouse search tool. Use it to locate treaties using such fields as keyword, country, treaty number, treaty type, party, subject, and many more!

Among the indexes included in this collection are:

  • Hein’s U.S. Treaty Index (1776-present): This comprehensive collection from Kavass covers U.S. Treaties from 1776 to the present, whether ratified or not.
  • United Nations Treaty Series (1948-present): Publication of treaties and international agreements registered or filed with the Secretariat of the United Nations.
  • League of Nations Treaty Series (1920-1946): Contains all treaties registered with the Secretariat between members of the League or between members and non-members, with English and French translations accompanying reprints of the official texts.
  • Rohn’s World Treaty Index (1900-2000): Indexes all of the worldwide treaties from 1900-2000. HeinOnline takes this index and provides linking to the indexed treaties for the first time ever.
  • Historical Treaty Index (1648-1919): Contains all early treaties included in Clive Parry’s Consolidated Treaty Series. The index from the series was used to identify the full text and CTS original cite for each bilateral and multilateral treaty.
  • Wiktor’s Multilateral Treaty Calendar (1648-1995): Lists all multilateral treaties concluded during the 350 year period and provides information on the location of their printed text in various collections (with parallel citations), adds data on duration, depository arrangements, and status, and provides extensive notes on their amendment, modification, extension, termination, and other details (with related references).
  • Martens’ Treaties (1761-1944): For the first time, the metadata for this massive 126 volume set has been indexed to search more than eight different works from Martens, including Recueil des traités.

The collection also includes hundreds of other books about treaties and their importance.
Titles such as Pan American Union Treaty Series, 9 v. (1956-1993), European
Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies, 4 v. (1917-
1937), Kavass’s Guide to the United States Treaties in Force (1982-2013), and many
more. A complete listing of included titles is available here:

A useful Quick Reference Guide is available here.

New HeinOnline Resources Added to the Library Catalogue


Approximately 4,700 new HeinOnline resources have been loaded to the library catalogue:

HeinOnline Core Collection 263 new titles
American Indian Law Collection 3 new titles
Foreign Relations of the U.S. 5 new title
History of International Law 84 new titles
Intellectual Property Law Collection 4 new titles
Law Journal Library 32 new titles
Scottish Legal History 1 new title
Subject Compilations of State Laws 3 new titles
U.S. Congressional Documents 2,825 new titles
Women and the Law (Peggy) 6 new titles
World Constitutions Illustrated: Contemporary & Historical Documents & Resources 1.527 new titles
World Trials Library 30 new titles

Libraries Celebrate Open Access Week with screening of “The Internet’s Own Boy”

York University Libraries will celebrate International Open Access Week from Oct. 20 to 26. Open Access Week is a global campaign that promotes open access as an ideal for the dissemination of scholarship and research. On Oct. 24, to reflect this year’s theme “Generation Open,” the libraries will host a movie screening and talk by Carys Craig, renowned copyright scholar and associate dean research and institutional relations at Osgoode Hall Law School.

Osgoode Prof Carys Craig

Osgoode Prof Carys Craiig

Professor Craig shares the enthusiasm of the global campaign. “I’m delighted that York University Libraries is celebrating Open Access Week. This is truly one of the most important social movements of the digital age, and one in which universities like ours have a vital role to play.” Open Access Week serves to highlight the successful realization of viable and sustainable business models for open access scholarship, particularly in the science, technology and medicine disciplines, and also provides an opportunity to identify, discuss and address barriers to adoption. The ultimate goal is to ensure that publicly funded research is available to the public, and that all global citizens have equal and barrier-free access to the wealth of the educational commons, regardless of their economic means.

Aaron Swartz

Aaron Swartz

The Internet’s Own Boy is a documentary highlighting the extraordinary life of Aaron Swartz. A key author of the RSS standard at the age of 14, Swartz was also a tireless advocate against censorship, co-founding the Demand Progress organization, which successfully halted SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) legislation from coming into force. In the course of his pursuit of public access to academic research, Swartz was apprehended for a mass downloading attempt of JSTOR holdings. Facing excessive punitive charges from a regime determined to make an example of him, he took his own life.

The screening will be introduced by Prof Craig. “This powerful documentary is not just a tribute to Swartz’s life and legacy, but is also a call to action for all of us.”  As author of Copyright, Communication & Culture: Towards a Relational Theory of Copyright Law (Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Press, 2011), Craig asks people to broaden their view of copyright beyond its tradition of possessive authorship to allow space for collective communication with the broader community with an eye for the greater public good. In her work, she calls on people to reimagine copyright and to correct the imbalance that Swartz fought to bring to the attention of the public sphere. Her insights will foster a nuanced and deeper appreciation for the causes Swartz so bravely hoped to further, highlighting the tragedy of his loss.