New from the Library Collection

Whether you’re faculty, JD student, graduate student or participating in the Moot Team, there’s something for everyone in the Osgoode Library’s growing collection. Here are some of the latest acquisitions in the library’s collection:

For information on the library’s recent acquisitions, e-resources, and databases, head to our New Titles list, and remember to subscribe to receive monthly updates!

Osgoode Digital Commons: Readership Snapshot

February 2019


In the month of February, the Osgoode Digital Commons had 35,292 full-text downloads and 72 new submissions, bringing the total works in the repository to 22,768.

Osgoode Hall Law School of York University scholarship was read by 2,271 institutions across 172 countries.


The most popular faculty publications were:

The most popular collections were:

Osgoode Digital Commons: Readership Snapshot

Last month, the Osgoode Digital Commons had 40,261 full-text downloads and 105 new submissions, bringing the total works in the repository to 17,256.

Osgoode Hall Law School of York University scholarship was read by 2,472 institutions across 172 countries.


The most popular faculty publications were:

The most popular collections were:


Osgoode Digital Commons: Readership Snapshot

October 2018


Last month, the Osgoode Digital Commons had 39,867 full-text downloads and 105 new submissions were posted, bringing the total works in the repository to 17,156.

Osgoode Hall Law School of York University scholarship was read by 2,807 institutions across 181 countries.


The most popular faculty papers were:

The most popular publications were:

Law Library Journal, v. 102, no. 2 Now Available

The latest issue of the Law Library Journal published by the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) is now available online.

Volume 102, Number 2 includes this great set of general articles:

This issue also includes an interesting exchange between Phillip Gragg and Christine L. Sellers in their ‘Back and Forth …’ column on Twitter. Other regular features include Mary Wishner learning from reference practice and Darla W. Jackson thinking about technology tools.

Hamlyn Lectures Digitized

The Hamlyn Lectures, presented annually at the School of Law of the University of Exeter since 1949, have been digitized and are available on the school’s website. The page is not perfectly clear: you have to scroll to the bottom to find the the table that lists the lectures chronologically, with links to the PDFs. All of the lectures from 1949 to 2004 have been digitized.

The Hamlyn Lecture Series was established in 1949 by the Hamlyn Trust, whose primary goal is to make law more comprehensible to ordinary citizens. The public lectures have been delivered annually by distinguished judges, practitioners, academics and other eminent speakers. From 2005 the lectures have been supplemented by an annual “Hamlyn Seminar” to promote the launch of the lectures around the time of their publication.

Digitization of Publications Relating to the Parliament of Canada

This report describes the digitization efforts of the Library of Parliamentary and was recently posted to their web site and blogged about yesterday by “Library Boy” (aka Michel-Adrien Sheppard, Supreme Court Reference Librarian).

The goal [of the working paper] is to help inform the development of a coherent strategy amongst the various stakeholders to digitize, make available and preserve over the long term, the corpus of Canadian publications relating to the operations of Parliament since 1867.

This working paper provides a “… ‘snapshot’ of the state of digitization of papers relating to the Parliament of Canada as of March 2009“, with an overview regarding:

  • which published papers relating to the operations of Parliament have been digitized;
  • by which organization;
  • where the digitized works are housed;
  • who is permitted access;
  • plans for future digitization.